Why EMS Teams Should Provide Pre-Hospital Access to Blood

Why EMS Teams Should Provide Pre-Hospital Access to Blood

Access to Blood

September is National Preparedness Month and agencies from FEMA to the American Red Cross are promoting readiness for emergency response teams in the event of a disaster. But are emergency responders across the nation truly ready for emergencies in their communities if they’re not able to provide pre-hospital access to blood?
 
It’s estimated that 25,000 deaths are preventable each year in the U.S., and hemorrhage is the leading cause of these deaths. In critical care emergencies, fast response and safe administration of blood can be the difference between life and death. With lives at stake, shouldn’t all emergency response teams today carry blood? It’s not that simple. The complexities of providing pre-hospital access to blood is explained in this infographic from Pelican BioThermal — a leader in temperature-controlled packaging that works with emergency responders to equip them with blood and help them save lives.
 
There are strong headwinds for emergency responders to carry blood. Baptist Health in Little Rock, Arkansas became the state’s first air medical service to carry blood products to patients in pre-hospital settings. Baptist Health flight paramedic Jackson Rogers led the charge to adopt the practice after seeing the benefits of safely transporting blood to the battlefields of Afghanistan via Pelican BioThermal’s temperature-controlled containers.
 
In turn, the UK’s Great North Air Ambulance Service (GNAAS) emergency responders used Pelican BioThermal’s temperature-controlled bags to safely transport blood to the scene of a major motorcycle accident — greatly contributing to the patient’s unexpected survival.